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  • Progress looks good!
    2000 TJ, 4.0, NV4500, Atlas 4.3, 06 Super Duty Diffs, D60/Sterling, ARBs, 5.38, 40” stickies, Weld on beadlocks, PSC full hydro steering, Vanco hydroboost, 16” King coilovers & King bumps, a radio that makes noise & a working Winch.

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    • More wiring progress... tedious, but I'm actually finding that I enjoy it a lot. There's a lot of creative problem solving involved, when figuring out the best way to route something so the cables are out of the way, safe from moving parts and chafing, and still get to where they need to go.

      Oh, but before I get to the wiring... check it out, my grille and fenders came back from paint!!!
      More Wiring Progress by skinnerstein, on Flickr

      Ignore the gigantic mess that is my garage. I keep putting off cleanup in favor of progress. I'm going to hate myself for that later.

      Headlight and turn signal wires on the driver's side. Every circuit gets its own, dedicated ground, which is why you only see two wires for each. I just got a couple of spools of black primary wire, some high quality crimp on ring connectors, and a really nice crimper so I can make good ground connections.
      More Wiring Progress by skinnerstein, on Flickr

      The primary harness bundle, finally mounted. Routed carefully away from pinch/chafe points and moving parts.
      More Wiring Progress by skinnerstein, on Flickr

      More of the primary harness bundle. This part of the wiring was a complete bird's nest before I took everything apart.
      More Wiring Progress by skinnerstein, on Flickr

      Here you get a better idea of what I still have to do on the passenger side, where the starter solenoid, battery, air pressure gauge, oil pressure gauge, and alternator are all wired up. I'm hiding the split of the bundle under the battery tray so it will look really clean.
      More Wiring Progress by skinnerstein, on Flickr

      I wanted to switch to all LED lighting, but I also didn't want to take away from the classic look of the CJ by using something like the JW Speaker lights. I found these 7" H4 housings on Amazon for $20 and some nice LED H4 replacement bulbs. Looks almost factory, but shouldn't have to worry about burned out lights for a LONG time.
      More Wiring Progress by skinnerstein, on Flickr

      Another shot from the side with the headlight on. Lighting's a bit better for seeing how the fender looks. So much room, I can't wait to see how it looks with 37's!
      More Wiring Progress by skinnerstein, on Flickr

      The tube steps are going to get powdercoated white. My cousin's husband just bought a powdercoating shop, so I'm hoping to get a family discount! :)

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      • Dude, you need to step back away from the Jeep and breathe! Enjoying wiring, can't you see you've gone too far!!!!

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        • Nothing like some early morning Weatherpack connecting... Decided to roll out of bed at 4 this morning so I could get some work in before it got warm (that, and I have to be at work at 7!)

          Here's a little Weatherpack 101 if anyone's interested. I decided to make MOST of the connectors on the Jeep Weatherpack so I'd know I had tight, secure, waterproof connections.

          Step 1: Strip the wires and slip the seals on:
          Weatherpack 101 - Turn Signals by skinnerstein, on Flickr

          Step 2: Put a connector on the wire and pinch the tabs to hold it to the seal. There are two crimps that will be made by the tool, one to make the electrical connection, and one to hold the seal in place:
          Weatherpack 101 - Turn Signals by skinnerstein, on Flickr

          Step 3: Put the connector/wire/seal assembly into the crimper. Weatherpack crimpers are expensive, but worth it, because they make the connection perfect every time as long as you use them right. I find that pinching the wire and the seal at the same time with one hand and operating the crimper with the other helps ensure nothing slides out of place. When it's done, it looks like this:
          Weatherpack 101 - Turn Signals by skinnerstein, on Flickr

          Step 4: Push the connector into the housing (male connectors go into shroud housings and female connectors go into tower housings) until it clicks:
          Weatherpack 101 - Turn Signals by skinnerstein, on Flickr

          BLAMMO! Weatherpacked:
          Weatherpack 101 - Turn Signals by skinnerstein, on Flickr

          And now my front turn signal/parking lights are ready for bulbs:
          Weatherpack 101 - Turn Signals by skinnerstein, on Flickr

          Comment


          • Jeff Brint
            LSJC Trail Leader - LSJC Moderator
            2013 JKU Rubicon w/Antirocks, Front Artec Truss & Gusseted, Full Rock Hard Skids, RK 3.5" Max Travel, 37" Nittos, Beadlocks, PS Front Stinger, 10K Winch, LoD Rock Sliders, LoD Shorty Rear w/Tire Carrier
            2018 White JLU Sahara, leather, 2" lift, 35" Nitto Ridge Grapplers

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            • Looks good, don't forget grommets anywhere wire pass through metal.
              2000 TJ, 4.0, NV4500, Atlas 4.3, 06 Super Duty Diffs, D60/Sterling, ARBs, 5.38, 40” stickies, Weld on beadlocks, PSC full hydro steering, Vanco hydroboost, 16” King coilovers & King bumps, a radio that makes noise & a working Winch.

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              • Been stalled lately, weekend before last I wound up working 22 hours so had zero Jeep tinkering time. This past weekend I had to recover from 12 straight 10+ hour work days, so the wife and I just spent the whole weekend binge watching shows on Netflix. It was rather nice.

                This morning I got out for about an hour and got the distributor wiring done. Spliced in the tach lead for the Howell EFI and buried that in the harness bundle so it still looks nice and neat. No pictures this time around, but I'm sure the wiring pics are getting pretty boring by now anyway :)

                Only have a few more things left to do under the hood and then I get to move on to the exciting part - the new dashboard and the sound system!

                Comment


                • Got up early this morning to work on the primary power distribution and alternator hookup. Still need to sort out the routing of the wires, but I've got the connections all figured out and most of the hardware mounted up.

                  Here are the starter solenoid and maxi fuse holder for the alternator. The Painless kit switches from a fusible link to a maxi fuse, which I think I'm good with because a fuse is a much quicker/easier trail repair than a fusible link (not that a fusible link is really difficult, but still...):
                  Power Distribution by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                  And here's the constant hot bus bar. This lets me provide good, clean power to the main panel, the relay center, and the field sense on the alternator without stacking a bunch of ring connectors on a battery terminal:
                  Power Distribution by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                  There's a nice little cover to help protect from accidental shorts, and I've got it mounted on top of the fender well to protect it from water. It's only about an inch lower than the battery terminals, so if I'm in water deep enough to hit that I'm probably in trouble anyway:
                  Power Distribution by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                  The proximity to the battery will let me run nice, short primary power cabling for the solenoid, starter, and bus bar. The only places I have to have long cable runs are for the amps (in the back) and the winch.

                  Comment


                  • A resettable CB is actually easier to reset on the trail than replacing a fuse.
                    They don't have buss bars with studs instead of screws?

                    2000 TJ, 4.0, NV4500, Atlas 4.3, 06 Super Duty Diffs, D60/Sterling, ARBs, 5.38, 40” stickies, Weld on beadlocks, PSC full hydro steering, Vanco hydroboost, 16” King coilovers & King bumps, a radio that makes noise & a working Winch.

                    Comment


                    • @Al: Very true, may look into that as an upgrade... And yes, there were some. Is there a major issue with using screws?

                      Big progress today on the engine bay wiring. Getting very close to the finish line there. Today moomooman came over to help out, so progress was a bit faster.

                      Got the wires routed for the distributor and oil pressure sender:
                      Almost Done with Engine Bay! by skinnerstein, on Flickr
                      Almost Done with Engine Bay! by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                      And got almost all of the primary harness bundle together, just have to get the wires for the relay center in and it'll be ready for sleeving and final mounting:
                      Almost Done with Engine Bay! by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                      Got the wiring for the alternator done. I read on one of Billavista's tech pages on Pirate that your alternator will sense voltage drops better if the field sense wire is connected to your bus or power distribution center, so I got rid of the "standard" loopback between the S wire and the + post and ran a wire to the bus bar for the field sense.
                      Almost Done with Engine Bay! by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                      The fender is a little bit of a mess right now, but the next step is to group wires together and put looms on them, so it will look much nicer soon:
                      Almost Done with Engine Bay! by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                      Also got the H4 harnesses installed for the headlights and mounted the LED ballasts. I went with H4 LED conversions because I found a set of housings that look almost exactly like the original sealed beam bulbs, and keeping an original-ish look is important to me:
                      Almost Done with Engine Bay! by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                      Just a little bit more to do to get the engine bay buttoned up:
                      - Build the sub-harness, which includes the wiring for the switch panel and the new gauges
                      - Build and install new plug wires along with new plugs
                      - Install the new battery tray
                      - Route the primary power wire for the amplifiers
                      - Clean up vacuum hose routing for a cleaner look
                      - Install brake booster, vacuum canister, and steering column

                      After that I can close up the hood and move on to the interior, where the wiring is even MORE complex! HOORAY!

                      Comment


                      • Looks like its coming along nicely Chris!
                        Jeff Brint
                        LSJC Trail Leader - LSJC Moderator
                        2013 JKU Rubicon w/Antirocks, Front Artec Truss & Gusseted, Full Rock Hard Skids, RK 3.5" Max Travel, 37" Nittos, Beadlocks, PS Front Stinger, 10K Winch, LoD Rock Sliders, LoD Shorty Rear w/Tire Carrier
                        2018 White JLU Sahara, leather, 2" lift, 35" Nitto Ridge Grapplers

                        Comment


                        • Nothing wrong really with using screws, it's all studs on airplanes so it's just easier to stack end connectors on a stud than using a screw.
                          2000 TJ, 4.0, NV4500, Atlas 4.3, 06 Super Duty Diffs, D60/Sterling, ARBs, 5.38, 40” stickies, Weld on beadlocks, PSC full hydro steering, Vanco hydroboost, 16” King coilovers & King bumps, a radio that makes noise & a working Winch.

                          Comment


                          • Taking your advice on the breaker, Al... Painless told me I needed to go with a bigger fuse anyway, since I'm running the CS130 alternator that can put out twice as much as the stock 12si. Went with a pair of 150 amp breakers, one between the alternator and the battery and one between the primary hot bus and the battery. Also bought some 8awg wire for both circuits to ensure minimal voltage drop (<5% in both cases).

                            Sticking with my bus bars with screws, though, I don't have enough circuits to need to stack for now, and it's a reasonably easy swap down the line if that changes.

                            Might actually get some time to work on it tomorrow. Been working 50-55 hour weeks lately, which is good for funding but bad for finding time when I have enough energy to actually accomplish anything!

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                            • Good bit of progress this afternoon, managed to get about an hour to work on stuff..

                              Replaced the 12awg wire with 8awg between the alternator and battery and between the battery and hot bus, and installed my 150a breakers:
                              Under hood wiring getting closer by skinnerstein, on Flickr
                              (I rerouted a couple of wires after taking this picture because I was worried about chafing)

                              Got the alternator harness and air pressure sender all bundled up and loomed:
                              Under hood wiring getting closer by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                              Got the main bundle loomed up, here's the point where it splits out into all the different directions it needs to go (hides under the battery tray)
                              Under hood wiring getting closer by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                              And got the bundle mounted up to the firewall:
                              Under hood wiring getting closer by skinnerstein, on Flickr

                              There are three things left to do on the under-hood wiring:
                              1. Set up the sub-harness for the gauges and switch panel
                              2. Wire up the hood light so I can see when wrenching at night
                              3. Install the battery tray and batteries/isolator

                              Tomorrow I'm going to pick the hood, windshield frame, tailgate, and brackets up from the paint guy!

                              Comment


                              • Don't forget to leak check all your air stuff, less leaks = less compressor run time.
                                2000 TJ, 4.0, NV4500, Atlas 4.3, 06 Super Duty Diffs, D60/Sterling, ARBs, 5.38, 40” stickies, Weld on beadlocks, PSC full hydro steering, Vanco hydroboost, 16” King coilovers & King bumps, a radio that makes noise & a working Winch.

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